Curriculum Vitae

Jack Matthews 1942-

Born:  Brownwood, Texas

Religion:  None

Democrat

EDUCATION:

B. A. Howard Payne College 1965 (English, European History)

M. A. Texas A&M University 1968 (United States History)

Ph.D.  Texas Christian University 1993 (United States History)

TEACHING:

Associate Professor, Amarillo College, 1966-1990

Lecturer, Texas Christian University, 1993-1995

Adjunct Instructor, University of Texas at Arlington, 1995-1998

Professor, Cisco College, 1998-2015

Adjunct Instructor, Texas Wesleyan University, 2002-2014

HONORS:

Sigma Tau Delta, 1964

Gamma Beta Phi, 1964

National Endowment for the Humanities Grant, University of California at Los Angeles, Summer 1973

Honorary Member of Junior Bar Association of Amarillo, Texas, 1974

Honest Scrap Award for Blogging, 2010

OTHER ACTIVITIES:

Lecturer, German-American Institutes, Stuttgart, Munich, Nuremberg, 1998-1999

Fulbright Alumni Association, Fort Worth, Texas

American Historical Association

American Association of University Professors

PUBLISHED WRITINGS:

Review of  Dangerous Passage:  The Santa Fe Trail and the Mexican War, by William Y. Chalfant.  Pacific Historical Review LXV (May 1996):  326-27.

“Georgia O’Keeffe.”  The New Handbook of Texas, vol. IV:  1129-30.  Austin:  The Texas State Historical Association, 1996.

Review essay of The Comanchero Frontier:  A History of New Mexican-Plains Indian Relations, by Charles L. Kenner.  American Indian Culture and Research Journal 19 (Winter 1995):  258-61.

“The Influence of the Texas Panhandle-Plains on Georgia O’Keeffe.”  Panhandle-Plains Historical Review LVI (1984):  107-36.

WRITINGS AND PRESENTATIONS:

“Archeological Survey of Polytechnic Cemetery,” Fort Worth, Texas, September 2002.

“Border Consuls With Mexico, 1821-1865.”  Paper before National Records and Archives Administration Conference, Fort Worth, Texas, February 2000.

“Civil Rights in the United States Since the Civil War.”  Lecture to American Studies Department, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany, Winter 1999.

“American Indian Since the Wounded Knee Occupation 1973.”  Lecture to German-American Institutes in Stuttgart, Munich, and Nuremberg, Germany, summer 1999.

“Demographic Projections for Tarrant County Texas to 2030.”  Research project for Tarrant County Arts Council, January 1998.

“The French National Library.”  Radio interview with British Broadcasting Company (BBC), Paris, summer 1996.

“Burning Flags and Shooting Pistols:  U.S. Consuls to Mexico, 1821-1865.”  Southwest Social Science Convention, Dallas, Texas, March 1995.

“The Journey of One Hispanic Attorney From Diamond Hill-Jarvis to Downtown Fort Worth.”  National Endowment for the Humanities “Adelante”   Series of Fort Worth Library, November 1993.

“Oral Interview Series.”  Fort Worth Hispanic Oral History Project, Texas   Christian University, 1993.

“Little Favors from My Government:  United States Consuls to Mexico, 1821-1865.  Ph.D. diss., Texas Christian University, 1993.

“An Analysis of the Blue Lady Legends of the American Southwest.”  Southwest/Texas Popular Culture Association Meeting, Lubbock, Texas, Spring, 1989.

“Anthropological Field Guide to Northern Rio Grande Culture.”  Amarillo College Field Trip, 1989.

“Georgia O’Keeffe in Texas Panhandle.” Lecture to Harwood Foundation, Taos, New Mexico, ca. 1986.

“Behaviorism:  Pulling Habits Out of Rats.”  Paper for Science, Technology and Human Values Seminar, National Endowment for the Humanities, University of California at Los Angeles, 1973.

“Public Sentiment in the United States Towards the Tariff, 1816-1828.”  Master’s thesis, Texas A&M University, 1968.

Jack Matthews, Amarillo College, 1983

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s